Aunt Ester's Children Redeemed

Journeys to Freedom in August Wilson's Ten Plays of Twentieth-Century Black America

Reddit icon
e-mail icon
Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Google icon
LinkedIn icon
Riley Keene Temple
  • Eugene, OR: 
    Cascade Books
    , February
     2017.
     150 pages.
     $16.00.
     Paperback.
    ISBN
    9781498237802.
     For other formats: Link to Publisher's Website.

Description

August Wilson (1945-2005) wrote one play for every decade of the twentieth century that explored black life in America for the descendants of slaves. All of his characters seek wholeness, identity, and reconstituted selves after the terror of 250 years chattel slavery and its terrifying legacy. Their history, culture, wisdom, joys, triumphs, pain, sufferings, victories, weaknesses, and strengths are all embodied in one character, Aunt Ester. She is as old as the number of years blacks have been on these shores. All of the characters in the ten-play cycle are her children. Their search is through circumstance and adventure, certainly. This author demonstrates how Wilson uses language--poetry, the blues--to bring each play's characters to a point of wholeness, redemption, and freedom, not from history, but ennobled and strengthened by it. Wilson employs fundamental theological doctrines to exhort Aunt Ester's children to remember by whom and how they were freed and made whole.

About the Author(s)/Editor(s)/Translator(s): 

Riley Keene Temple is an avid American arts advocate and supporter, and has been honored for his leadership of arts organizations. He is a telecommunications attorney in Washington DC, where his Board memberships include the National Archives Foundation and the Trust for the National Endowment for the Humanities. He holds a Masters degree, cum laude, of Theological Studies from the Virginia Theological Seminary. He has written frequently on theology and the creative arts.

Add New Comment

Reading Religion welcomes comments from AAR members, and you may leave a comment below by logging in with your AAR Member ID and password. Please read our policy on commenting.

Log in to post comments