A Compendium of the Mahayana

Asanga's Mahāyānasaṃgraha and Its Indian and Tibetan Commentaries (3 Volume Set)

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Asanga
Translator(s): 
Karl Brunnhölzl
  • Boulder, CO: 
    Shambhala Publications
    , December
     2018.
     1824 pages.
     $79.95.
     Hardcover.
    ISBN
    9781559394659.
     For other formats: Link to Publisher's Website.
Review coming soon!

Review by Richard K. Payne forthcoming.

Description

The Mahāyānasaṃgraha, published here with its Indian and Tibetan commentaries in three volumes, presents virtually everything anybody might want to know about the Yogācāra School of mahāyāna Buddhism. It discusses in detail the nature and operation of the eight kinds of consciousness, the often-misunderstood notion of “mind only” (cittamātra), dependent origination, the cultivation of the path and its fruition in terms of the four wisdoms, and the three bodies (kāyas) of a buddha.

Volume 1 presents the translation of the Mahāyānasaṃgraha along with a commentary by Vasubandhu. The introduction gives an overview of the text and its Indian and Tibetan commentaries, and explains in detail two crucial elements of the Yogācāra view: the ālaya-consciousness and the afflicted mind (kliṣṭamanas).

Volume 2 presents translations of the commentary by Asvabhāva and an anonymous Indian commentary on the first chapter of the text. These translations are supplemented in the endnotes by excerpts from Tibetan commentaries and related passages in other Indian and Chinese Yogācāra works.

Volume 3 includes appendices with excerpts from other Indian and Chinese Yogācāra texts and supplementary materials on major Yogācāra topics in the Mahāyānasaṃgraha.

About the Author(s)/Editor(s)/Translator(s): 

Asanga was a fourth-century Indian adept and philosopher, and author of the foundational works of the Yogācāra school of Buddhist philosophy.

Karl Brunnhölzl was trained as a physician and also studied Tibetology. He received his systematic training in Tibetan language and Buddhist philosophy and practice at the Marpa Institute for Translators, founded by Khenpo Tsultrim Gyamtso Rinpoche. Since 1989 he has been a translator and interpreter from Tibetan and English. He is presently involved with the Nitartha Institute as a teacher and translator.

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