Confucianism for the Contemporary World

Global Order, Political Plurality, and Social Action

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Editor(s): 
Tze-ki Hon, Kristin Stapleton
SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture
  • Albany, NY: 
    State University of New York Press
    , November
     2017.
     300 pages.
     $85.00.
     Hardcover.
    ISBN
    9781438466514.
     For other formats: Link to Publisher's Website.

Description

Discusses contemporary Confucianism’s relevance and its capacity to address pressing social and political issues of twenty-first-century life.

Condemned during the Maoist era as a relic of feudalism, Confucianism enjoyed a robust revival in post-Mao China as China’s economy began its rapid expansion and gradual integration into the global economy. Associated with economic development, individual growth, and social progress by its advocates, Confucianism became a potent force in shaping politics and society in mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and overseas Chinese communities. This book links the contemporary Confucian revival to debates—both within and outside China—about global capitalism, East Asian modernity, political reforms, civil society, and human alienation. The contributors offer fresh insights on the contemporary Confucian revival as a broad cultural phenomenon, encompassing an interpretation of Confucian moral teaching; a theory of political action; a vision of social justice; and a perspective for a new global order, in addition to demonstrating that Confucianism is capable of addressing a wide range of social and political issues in the twenty-first century.

About the Author(s)/Editor(s)/Translator(s): 

Tze-ki Hon is professor of Chinese and history at City University of Hong Kong. He is the author of The Yijingand Chinese Politics: Classical Commentary and Literati Activism in the Northern Song Period, 960–1127, also published by SUNY Press; Revolution as Restoration: Guocui Xuebao and China’s Path to Modernity, 1905–1911; and The Allure of the Nation: The Cultural and Historical Debates in Late Qing and Republican China.

Kristin Stapleton is professor of history at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York. She is the author of Civilizing Chengdu: Chinese Urban Reform, 1895–1937 and Fact in Fiction: 1920s China and Ba Jin’s Family.

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