Divine Variations

How Christian Thought Became Racial Science

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Terence Keel
  • Stanford, CA: 
    Stanford University Press
    , January
     2018.
     200 pages.
     $60.00.
     Hardcover.
    ISBN
    9780804795401.
     For other formats: Link to Publisher's Website.

Description

This title is also being reviewed in JAAR by Theodore Vial, Jr.

Divine Variations offers a new account of the development of scientific ideas about race. Focusing on the production of scientific knowledge over the last three centuries, Terence Keel uncovers the persistent links between pre-modern Christian thought and contemporary scientific perceptions of human difference. He argues that, instead of a rupture between religion and modern biology on the question of human origins, modern scientific theories of race are, in fact, an extension of Christian intellectual history. Keel's study draws on ancient and early modern theological texts and biblical commentaries, works in Christian natural philosophy, seminal studies in ethnology and early social science, debates within twentieth-century public health research, and recent genetic analysis of population differences and ancient human DNA. From these sources, Keel demonstrates that Christian ideas about creation, ancestry, and universalism helped form the basis of modern scientific accounts of human diversity--despite the ostensible shift in modern biology towards scientific naturalism, objectivity, and value neutrality. By showing the connections between Christian thought and scientific racial thinking, this book calls into question the notion that science and religion are mutually exclusive intellectual domains and proposes that the advance of modern science did not follow a linear process of secularization.

About the Author(s)/Editor(s)/Translator(s): 

Terence Keel is Assistant Professor of History and Black Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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