The Economy of Salvation

Ethical and Anthropological Foundations of Market Relations in the First Two Books of the Bible

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Luigino Bruni
Virtue and Economics
  • London, England: 
    Palgrave Macmillan
    , April
     2019.
     187 pages.
     $139.99.
     Hardcover.
    ISBN
    978303040819.
     For other formats: Link to Publisher's Website.

Description

This book provides a systematic commentary on the first two books of the Bible: Genesis and Exodus. Drawing on these two essential books, it subsequently offers new readings of several issues relevant for today’s economic and social life.

Western Humanism has its own founding cultural and symbolic codes. One of them is the Bible, which has for millennia provided a wealth of expressions on politics and love, death and economy, hope and doom. Biblical stories have been revived and reinterpreted by hundreds of generations, and have informed many of our most beautiful works of art, not to mention the dreams of children and adults alike. And they have given us hope during the many painful times of exile and oppression that we have gone through, and are going through still.

Among the books of the Bible, in both the Jewish and Christian traditions, Genesis and Exodus represent the true foundation of biblical theology and anthropology, but in them we also find the roots of the culture of markets, money and commerce, which would go on to flourish during the Middle Ages and ultimately form the ‘spirit of capitalism’ (Max Weber) or the ‘religion of capitalism’ (Walter Benjamin) in the modern era. 

This book examines the Biblical foundations of our conception of social relations, and offers new insights on the present economic and social discourse. 

About the Author(s)/Editor(s)/Translator(s): 

Luigino Bruni is Professor of Economics at Lumsa University, Rome. He studies ethics and economics, philosophy, history of ideas, and the links between economics and theology.

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