New Monasticism and the Transformation of American Evangelicalism

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Wes Markofski
  • New York, NY: 
    Oxford University Press
    , June
     2015.
     384 pages.
     $35.00.
     Paperback.
    ISBN
    9780190258016.
     For other formats: Link to Publisher's Website.

Description

This book has been reviewed in JAAR by John Schmalzbauer. Click here to read the review.

For most of the last century, popular and scholarly common sense has equated American evangelicalism with across-the-board social, economic, and political conservatism. However, if a growing chorus of evangelical leaders, media pundits, and religious scholars is to be believed, the era of uncontested evangelical conservatism is on the brink of collapse-if it hasn't collapsed already. Combining vivid ethnographic storytelling and incisive theoretical analysis, New Monasticism and the Transformation of American Evangelicalism introduces readers to the fascinating and unexplored terrain of neo-monastic evangelicalism. Often located in disadvantaged urban neighborhoods, new monastic communities pursue religiously inspired visions of racial, social, and economic justice-alongside personal spiritual transformation-through diverse and creative expressions of radical community. 

In this account, Wes Markofski has immersed himself in the paradoxical world of evangelical neo-monasticism, focusing on the Urban Monastery-an influential neo-monastic community located in a gritty, racially diverse neighborhood in a major Midwestern American city. The resulting account of the way in which this movement reflects and is contributing to the transformation of American evangelicalism challenges entrenched stereotypes and calls attention to the dynamic diversity of religious and political points of view which vie for supremacy in the American evangelical subculture.New Monasticism and the Transformation of American Evangelicalism is the first sociological analysis of new monastic evangelicalism and the first major work to theorize the growing theological and political diversity within twenty-first-century American evangelicalism.

About the Author(s)/Editor(s)/Translator(s): 

Wes Markofski is a doctoral candidate in the department of sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a graduate research fellow in the Institute for Research on Poverty.

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