Political Realism in Apocalyptic Times

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Alison McQueen
  • Cambridge, England: 
    Cambridge University Press
    , December
     2017.
     248 pages.
     $100.00.
     Hardcover.
    ISBN
    9781107152397.
     For other formats: Link to Publisher's Website.
Review coming soon!

Review by Steven Lane forthcoming.

Description

From climate change to nuclear war to the rise of demagogic populists, our world is shaped by doomsday expectations. In this path-breaking book, Alison McQueen shows why three of history's greatest political realists feared apocalyptic politics. Niccolò Machiavelli in the midst of Italy's vicious power struggles, Thomas Hobbes during England's bloody civil war, and Hans Morgenthau at the dawn of the thermonuclear age all saw the temptation to prophesy the end of days. Each engaged in subtle and surprising strategies to oppose apocalypticism, from using its own rhetoric to neutralize its worst effects to insisting on a clear-eyed, tragic acceptance of the human condition. Scholarly yet accessible, this book is at once an ambitious contribution to the history of political thought and a work that speaks to our times.

About the Author(s)/Editor(s)/Translator(s): 

Alison McQueen is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. She writes on the history of political thought, religion in early modern political thought, and political realism. Her work has been published in the Journal of Politics, Perspectives on Politics, European Journal of Political Theory, Political Theory, and Critical Review of Social and Political Philosophy. She is the recipient of the American Political Science Association's Leo Strauss Award for the best dissertation in political philosophy (2012). She has held fellowships at Princeton's University Center for Human Values and the Stanford Humanities Center.
Read more at http://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/subjects/politics-international-rel...

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