Ute Land Religion in the American West, 1879-2009

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Brandi Denison
New Visions in Native American and Indigenous Studies Series
  • Chapel Hill, NC: 
    University of Nebraska Press
    , July
     2017.
     330 pages.
     $55.00.
     Hardcover.
    ISBN
    9780803276741.
     For other formats: Link to Publisher's Website.
Review coming soon!

Review by Emily Suzanne Clark forthcoming.

Description

Ute Land Religion in the American West, 1879–2009 is a narrative of American religion and how it intersected with land in the American West. Prior to 1881, Utes lived on the largest reservation in North America—twelve million acres of western Colorado. Brandi Denison takes a broad look at the Ute land dispossession and resistance to disenfranchisement by tracing the shifting cultural meaning of dirt, a physical thing, into land, an abstract idea. This shift was made possible through the development and deployment of an idealized American religion based on Enlightenment ideals of individualism, Victorian sensibilities about the female body, and an emerging respect for diversity and commitment to religious pluralism that was wholly dependent on a separation of economics from religion. 

As the narrative unfolds, Denison shows how Utes and their Anglo-American allies worked together to systematize a religion out of existing ceremonial practices, anthropological observations, and Euro-American ideals of nature. A variety of societies then used religious beliefs and practices to give meaning to the land, which in turn shaped inhabitants’ perception of an exclusive American religion. Ultimately, this movement from the tangible to the abstract demonstrates the development of a normative American religion, one that excludes minorities even as they are the source of the idealized expression.

About the Author(s)/Editor(s)/Translator(s): 

Brandi Denison is assistant professor of religious studies in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at the University of North Florida. 

Keywords: 

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