Media and Science-Religion Conflict

Mass Persuasion in the Evolution Wars

Reddit icon
e-mail icon
Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Google icon
LinkedIn icon
Thomas Aechtner
Routledge Studies in Religion
  • London: 
    Routledge
    , January
     2020.
     268 pages.
     $47.95.
     E-Book.
    ISBN
    9780367375546.
     For other formats: Link to Publisher's Website.

Description

***We have this title in eBook format ONLY***

This book examines why the religion-science skirmishes known as the Evolution Wars have persisted into the 21st century. It does so by considering the influences of mass media in relation to decision-making research and the Elaboration Likelihood Model, one of the most authoritative persuasion theories.

The book’s analysis concentrates on the expression of cues, or cognitive mental shortcuts, in Darwin-sceptic and counter-creationist broadcasts. A multiyear collection of media generated by the most prominent Darwin-sceptic organizations is surveyed, along with rival publications from supporters of evolutionary theory described as the pro-evolutionists. The analysed materials include works produced by Young Earth Creationist and Intelligent Design media makers, New Atheist pacesetters, as well as both agnostic and religious supporters of evolution. These cues are shown to function as subtle but effective means of shaping public opinion, including appeals to expertise, claims that ideas are being censored, and the tactical use of statistics and technical jargon.

Contending that persuasive mass media is a decisive component of science-religion controversies, this book will be of keen interest to scholars of Religion, Science and Religion interactions, as well as researchers of Media and Communication Studies more generally.

About the Author(s)/Editor(s)/Translator(s): 

Thomas Aechtner is a senior lecturer in religion and acience at the University of Queensland, Australia. He has published multiple articles and chapters on science and religion as well as a monograph entitled Health, Wealth, and Power in an African Diaspora Church in Canada (2015).

Comments

Reading Religion welcomes comments from AAR members, and you may leave a comment below by logging in with your AAR Member ID and password. Please read our policy on commenting.