The Oxford History of Anglicanism, Volume IV

Global Western Anglicanism, c 1910-present

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Editor(s): 
Jeremy Morris
  • Oxford, U.K.: 
    Oxford University Press
    , February
     2017.
     464 pages.
     $142.00.
     Hardcover.
    ISBN
    9780199641406.
     For other formats: Link to Publisher's Website.
Review coming soon!

Review by Peter Webster forthcoming.

Description

The Oxford History of Anglicanism is a major new and unprecedented international study of the identity and historical influence of one of the world's largest versions of Christianity. This global study of Anglicanism from the sixteenth century looks at how was Anglican identity constructed and contested at various periods since the sixteenth century; and what was its historical influence during the past six centuries. It explores not just the ecclesiastical and theological aspects of global Anglicanism, but also the political, social, economic, and cultural influences of this form of Christianity that has been historically significant in western culture, and a burgeoning force in non-western societies today. The chapters are written by international exports in their various historical fields which includes the most recent research in their areas, as well as original research. The series forms an invaluable reference for both scholars and interested non-specialists. Volume four of The Oxford History of Anglicanism explores Anglicanism from 1910 to present day.

About the Author(s)/Editor(s)/Translator(s): 

Jeremy Morris is master of trinity hall. He was dean of trinity hall from 2001 to 2010, and then of King's College, Cambridge from 2010 to 2014. His academic interests include modern European church history, Anglican theology and ecclesiology (especially High Anglicanism), the ecumenical movement, and arguments about religion and secularization. His publications include F. D. Maurice and the Crisis of Christian Authority (OUP, 2005) and The High Church Revival in the Church of England (Brill, 2016).

Keywords: 

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