Reclaiming Islamic Tradition

Modern Interpretations of the Classical Heritage

Reddit icon
e-mail icon
Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Google icon
LinkedIn icon
Editor(s): 
Elisabeth Kendall, Ahmad Khan
  • Edinburgh, UK: 
    Edinburgh University Press
    , August
     2016.
     224 pages.
     £70.00.
     Hardcover.
    ISBN
    9781474403115.
     For other formats: Link to Publisher's Website.

Description

Recent events in the Islamic world have demonstrated the endurance, neglect and careful reshaping of the classical Islamic heritage. A range of modern Islamic movements and intellectuals has sought to reclaim certain concepts, ideas, persons and trends from the Islamic tradition. This book profiles some of the fundamental debates that have defined the conversation between the past and the present in the Islamic world. Qur’anic exegesis, Islamic law, gender, violence and eschatology are just some of the key themes in this study of the Islamic tradition’s vitality in the modern Islamic world. This book will allow readers to situate modern developments in the Islamic world within the longue durée of Islamic history and thought.

About the Author(s)/Editor(s)/Translator(s): 

Elisabeth Kendall is Senior Research Fellow in Arabic and Islamic Studies at Pembroke College, University of Oxford. Her research focuses on how Arabic cultural production fuels political and militant movements. Her books include Twenty-First Century Jihad (with Ewan Stein, 2015), Literature, Journalism and the Avant-Garde (2006) and Media Arabic (2nd ed. 2012). She has studied and worked at the Universities of Oxford, Harvard and Edinburgh.

Ahmad Khan is postdoctoral researcher at Universität Hamburg, Asien-Afrika-Institut. In 2014-15, he was Lecturer in Islamic Studies at the University of Oxford, Faculty of Oriental Studies. His D.Phil (Oxon) examined discourses of heresy and the formation of medieval Sunni orthodoxy. His current research focuses on the history of medieval Iran. His second research specialism concerns modern Islamic history/thought, particularly the emergence of publishing houses and editors in the Islamic world.

Add New Comment

Reading Religion welcomes comments from AAR members, and you may leave a comment below by logging in with your AAR Member ID and password. Please read our policy on commenting.

Log in to post comments